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Taxing Ourselves: A Citizen's Guide to the Debate Over Taxes
Tax Policy in the Real World
The Taxation of Multinational Corporations
Taxing Multinational Corporations
The Effects of Taxation on Multinational Corporations
Studies in International Taxation
Taxation in the Global Economy
 


Taxing Ourselves: A Citizen's Guide to the Debate Over Taxes
by Joel Slemrod and Jon Bakija
The MIT Press, 4rd edition, forthcoming

Who should pay taxes, how should they be collected, and how do they affect the economy? Should the income tax be tinkered with, replaced with a flat tax, or left alone? Cutting through the academic jargon and self-serving Washington-speak, Joel Slemrod and Jon Bakija bring together all of the data, analytical insight, and related material bearing on tax reform to explore the fundamental questions and choices inherent in tax policy-making.
Taxing Ourselves begins with a concise overview of the U.S. tax system as it exists today, offering historical and international perspectives on taxation. It examines the criteria that should serve as guides for tax policy--fairness, the promotion of economic prosperity, and simplicity--and explores the controversies and difficulties related to each one. Crucial questions about how the burden of our tax system is actually distributed and the economic effects of taxation are addressed.
Slemrod and Bakija review the key elements of fundamental tax reform proposals, including a single rate, a clean base, and a consumption base. Finally they take a detailed look at the major alternatives for tax reform, providing concise guidelines that will make clear the choices involved in tax policy.

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Tax Policy in the Real World
Edited by Joel Slemrod
Cambridge University Press, 1999
This volume collects articles from the Symposium series of the National Tax Journal from 1993 to 1998. Leading economists and other scholars discuss and debate current tax policy issues in nontechnical language and illustrate how the principles of tax analysis can be applied to real-world issues. Among the topics addressed are the practical feasibility of consumption tax alternatives to the current income tax, the rationale and implications of devolution of fiscal responsibilities to state and local governments, the effect of tax policy on economic growth, and the value of local tax incentives designed to attract and retain business.
 

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The Taxation of Multinational Corporations
Edited by Joel Slemrod
Kluwer Academic Publishers, 1996
The six papers in this volume represent state-of-the-art empirical and conceptual research on various aspects of the taxation of multinational corporations. Topics include: rules for the allocation of interest expense between domestic (U.S.) and foreign-source income; compliance with the foreign tax provision of the U.S. tax code; an international comparison of the average effective rates of corporate taxation of multinationals; the effect of taxation on foreign direct investment; and international tax policy reviewed in parallel with the theory of international trade

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Taxing Multinational Corporations
Edited by Martin Feldstein, James R. Hines Jr., and R. Glenn Hubbard
National Bureau of Economic Research and The University of Chicago Press, 1995
In the increasingly global business environment of the 1990s, policymakers and executives of multinational corporations must make informed decisions based on a sound knowledge of U.S. and foreign tax policy. Written for a nontechnical audience, Taxing Multinational Corporations summarizes up-to-the-minute research on the structure and effects of tax policies. The book covers such practical issues as the impact of tax law on U.S. competitiveness, the volume and location of research and development spending, the extent of foreign direct investment, and the financial practices of multinational companies.
In ten succinct chapters, the book documents the channels through which tax policy in the United States and abroad affects plant and equipment investments, spending on research and development, the cost of debt and equity finance, and dividend repatriations by United States subsidiaries. It also discusses the impact of U.S. firms' outbound foreign investment on domestic and foreign economies. Especially useful to nonspecialists is an appendix that summarizes current United States rules for taxing international income.
The findings of this volume will be of immediate value to executives, lawyers, accountants, and all who seek a concise, thorough overview of international taxation. It is also of long-term value to scholars and policymakers as they debate reforms of international tax rules in the United States and elsewhere.

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The Effects of Taxation on Multinational Corporations
Edited by Martin Feldstein, James R. Hines Jr., and R. Glenn Hubbard
National Bureau of Economic Research and The University of Chicago Press, 1990
The tax rules of the United States and other countries have intended and unintended effects on the operations of multinational corporations, influencing everything from the formation and allocation of capital to competitive strategies. The growing importance of international business has led economists to reconsider whether current systems of taxing international income are viable in a world of significant capital market integration and global commercial competition.
This volume examines the effect of tax policy on international investment choices by presenting in-depth analyses of the interaction of international tax rules and the investment decisions of multinational enterprises. Ten papers assess the role of investment by multinational firms in the U.S. economy and the design of international tax rules for multinational investment; analyze channels through which international tax rules affect the costs of international business activities; and examine ways in which international tax rules affect financing decisions of multinational firms. As a group, the papers demonstrate that international tax rules have significant effects on firms' investment and other financing decisions.
This state-of-the-art volume will be of interest to researchers in public finance and international economics and to policymakers concerned with tax policy and international investment issues.

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Studies in International Taxation
Edited by Alberto Giovannini, R. Glenn Hubbard, and Joel Slemrod
National Bureau of Economic Research and The University of Chicago Press, 1990
As a united global economy evolves, economists and policymakers are forced to consider whether the current system of taxing income is inconsistent with the trend toward liberalized world financial flows and increased international competition. To help assess existing tax policies and incentives, this volume presents new research on how taxes affect the investment and financing decisions of multinationals today.
The contributors examine the effects of taxation on decisions about international financial management, business investment, and international income shifting. They consider the influence of tax rules on dividend policy decisions within multinationals; the extent to which tax incentives affect the level and location of research and development across countries; and the fact that foreign-controlled companies operating in the United States pay lower taxes than do domestically controlled companies.

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Taxation in the Global Economy

Edited by Assaf Razin and Joel Slemrod
National Bureau of Economic Research and The University of Chicago Press, 1990
The increasing globalization of economic activity is bringing an awareness of the international consequences of tax policy. The move toward the common European market in 1992 raises the important question of how inefficiences in the various tax systems--such as self-defeating tax competition among member nations--will be addressed. As barriers to trade and investment tumble, cross-national differences in tax structure may loom larger and create incentives for relocations of capital and labor. Efficient and equitable income tax systems are becoming more difficult to administer and enforce, particularly because of the growing importance of multinational enterprises. What will be the role of tax policy in this more integrated world economy?
Assaf Razin and Joel Slemrod gathered experts from two traditionally distinct specialties, taxation and international economics, to lay the groundwork for understanding these issues, which will require the attention of scholars and policymakers for years to come.
Contributors describe the basic provisions of the U.S. tax code with respect to international transactions, highlighting the changes contained in the Tax Reform Act of 1986; explore the ways that tax systems influence the decisions of multinationals; examine the effect of taxation on trade patterns and capital flows; and discuss the implications of the opening world economy for the design of optimal tax policy. The papers will prove valuable not only to academics, but to government economists and international tax lawyers as well.