Course Descriptions

Course catalog descriptions for courses offered in all currently published terms.

Technology & Operations

Department Chairperson: Kapuscinski, Roman
 
 
TO 200 Personal Productivity in Information Technology
  1.5 hours Core Terms Offered: F13
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in TO 301 
   
  Personal Productivity in Information Technology --- Following the AACSB guidelines for undergraduate programs in business, this course focuses on the development of skills in the use of information technology. To that end, the course includes exercises and assignments that involve the use of spreadsheets (Excel), databases (Access and SQL), web development tools (FrontPage), and other software as appropriate. Classes will include a mixture of laboratories, lectures, and discussions.
 
 
TO 300 Business Information Systems
  1.5 hours Core Terms Offered: W13, W14
   
  Business Information Systems --- In keeping with AACSB guidelines, this course focuses on information technologies as they influence the structure and processes of organizations and economies, and as they influence the roles and techniques of management. We will address such questions as: How do information systems influence organizational competitiveness? Why are technology infrastructures so important to modern organizations? What is the role of the Internet and networking technology in organizations? How do information systems enable organizational processes? How do organizations develop, acquire and implement information systems? What ethical, criminal and security issues do organizations face when using information systems? Students will acquire knowledge and skills in this area through discussion of articles selected from a variety of academic and business journals as well as several HBS cases.
 
 
TO 301 Business Analytics and Statistics
  4 hours Core Terms Offered: W13, F14, W14
   
  Business Analytics and Statistics --- The ability to make intelligent decisions based on data and information is critical for both managers and firms, particularly in the modern era with large amounts of data readily available. This course teaches the fundamental analytical and statistical tools to enable such analysis and decision-making. Students are taught how to describe, gather and analyze business data. This entails hands-on computer exercises on real data sets, both in class and in homework assignments. Model-building, analysis, and effective communication of recommendations are taught, using examples from a variety of business contexts such as finance, marketing, operations, and strategic management.
 
 
TO 302 Managing Business Operations
  3 hours Elective Terms Offered: F13, F14
  Course Prerequisites: (MATH 115 or 116 or 120 or 215) and (No Credit in TO 313) 
   
  Managing Business Operations --- Technology and Operations studies the business processes by which inputs of materials, labor, capital, and information are transformed into products and services which customers want and are willing to pay for. Effectively managing these processes will enhance firms' competitive advantage in the marketplace. This course prepares students to think managerially and analytically about business processes, and provides students with the tools to analyze and continuously improve these processes.
 
 
TO 311 Decision Support with Excel
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, W13, W14
   
  Decision Support with Excel --- Spreadsheets are among the most widely used decision support tools in business today, and have advanced to the point of providing powerful, general-purpose functionally. The first half of the course introduces decision support modeling using spreadsheets, including: what-if analysis; financial, statistical, and time/date functions; graphical presentation of data; organizing and extracting information from spreadsheet databases; and cross-tabulation of data. The second half of the course includes importing information into spreadsheets from external sources; goal seeking; one and two way data tables; the use of a solver to find optimal solutions to problems; designing macros to develop semi-automated and fully automated spreadsheet applications; and probabilistic modeling to support risk analysis in the context of spreadsheets. Lecture/demonstrations illustrate the features of spreadsheet software. Lab work involves carrying out hands-on tutorials in a supervised setting, then reinforcing and extending conceptual and operational aspects of the material by doing follow-up cases. Windows-based spread-sheeting software (such as Excel for Windows) is typically studied in the course.
 
 
TO 313 Operations Management
  3 hours Core Terms Offered: W13, W14
  Advisory Prerequisites: JR,CIS&S301 
   
  Operations Management --- In a dynamic, competitive world, a company's effectiveness depends significantly on how well the firm's resources are managed. Managing a company's critical performance dimensions-quality, speed, flexibility, and cost-warrants a thorough understanding of both the physical and information processes that are required for developing and manufacturing products and delivering them to the customers. This course focuses on managerial tools for understanding these processes, and prepares the students to use the results of analysis to constantly improve the firm's operational performance. This course is taught through lectures, readings, and cases.
 
 
TO 399 Independent Study
  1 - 3 hours Elective Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
   
  Independent Study Project --- Individual research projects, supervised by faculty, are available to juniors and seniors in good academic standing. To select a project, students should consult the appropriate professor about the nature of the research and the number of credit hours the work would garner. Students earn one to three credit hours per project and may elect only one research project in a term and no more than three over the course of their program. No more than seven credit hours from research projects will count toward degree requirments.
 
 
TO 410 Supply Chain Management
  3 hours Terms Offered: W13, W14
  Course Prerequisites: TO 301 
   
  Supply Chain Management --- This course covers strategic issues in logistics and supply chain management, including supply chain design, the drivers of supply chain performance, and the impact of the supply chain on a firm's overall performance. The course is ideal for students considering a professional or consulting career in supply chain analysis and management.
 
 
TO 411 Support With Excel
  3 hours Elective Terms Offered: F14
   
  Decision Support with Excel --- Spreadsheets are among the most widely used decision support tools in business today, and have advanced to the point of providing powerful, general-purpose functionally. The first half of the course introduces decision support modeling using spreadsheets, including: what-if analysis; financial, statistical, and time/date functions; graphical presentation of data; organizing and extracting information from spreadsheet databases; and cross-tabulation of data. The second half of the course includes importing information into spreadsheets from external sources; goal seeking; one and two way data tables; the use of a solver to find optimal solutions to problems; designing macros to develop semi-automated and fully automated spreadsheet applications; and probabilistic modeling to support risk analysis in the context of spreadsheets. Lecture/demonstrations illustrate the features of spreadsheet software. Lab work involves carrying out hands-on tutorials in a supervised setting, then reinforcing and extending conceptual and operational aspects of the material by doing follow-up cases. Windows-based spread-sheeting software (such as Excel for Windows) is typically studied in the course.
 
 
TO 465 Business Systems Consulting
  3 hours Terms Offered: W13
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 300 and senior standing/permission of instructor 
   
  Business Systems Consulting --- This course provides an integrating experience for seniors. Student teams are cast into the role of "consultants" to the executive management of the Velocity Manufacturing Co. (an imaginary company). The facts of the consulting engagement are presented to the students as a portfolio of case materials consisting of text, graphics, videotape, lecture, spreadsheet models, computer simulations, digitized factory data, company financial data and active participation of students in Velocity's production scheduling and manufacturing operations. The students are tasked with developing and "selling" a compelling business case of investment in new processes and systems to Velocity's management.
 
 
TO 482 Action Learning Projects in Operations, Procurement, and Supply Chain Management
  7.5 hours Elective Terms Offered: F13, F14
  Course Prerequisites: TO 313 and (No credit in BA 353) 
   
  Action Learning Projects in Operations, Procurement, and Supply Chain Management --- This course provides an opportunity for students to deepen their knowledge in operations, procurement and supply chain management through action learning projects. Students will address a major operations or supply chain problem in a company through a 14-week action learning project. The course is taught in cooperation with AT Kearney, and students will also be provided guest lectures (by AT Kearney and Fortune 500 company executives) on how to approach consulting in operations and supply chain and on recent developments in these areas from different industries.
 
 
TO 501 Applied Business Statistics
  3 hours Core Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in TO 502 
  Advisory Prerequisites: College algebra 
   
  Applied Business Statistics --- Evening MBA Core Course. Mathematics review; descriptive statistics, and the graphical description of data. Calculation of even probabilities, random sampling, and assessing personal probabilities. Normal, binomial, and Poisson distributions. Sampling distributions and the tabular analysis of large data sets. Confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses. The computer will be used to demonstrate these topics. Decision trees and expected value of information. Quality control charts; simulation models. Correlation and regression analysis with diagnostics. Framing hypotheses based on large data sets; survey sampling concepts.
 
 
TO 502 Applied Business Statistics
  2.25 hours Core Terms Offered: F13(A), F14(A)
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in TO 501 
  Advisory Prerequisites: College algebra 
   
  Applied Business Statistics --- This course covers probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and simple and multiple regression analysis. Business applications are used to illustrate these concepts. The course requires familiarity with the statistical analysis package of MS Excel.
 
 
TO 505 Business Fundamentals Bootcamp
  1 hours Core Terms Offered: W13, W14
   
  Business Fundamentals Bootcamp --- The objective of the course is to familiarize the MSCM students with the core business fundamentals. Various core business functions are covered in several modules, delivered by faculty from respective areas. The intention is that the MSCM students will develop business literacy and develop a basic understanding of other business functions and their role in operations and supply chain management-the focus of the MSCM degree.
 
 
TO 512 Decision Support with Spreadsheets
  1.5 hours Elective Terms Offered: F13(A), F14(A), W13(A), W14(A)
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in TO 311, 511 
   
  Decision Support with Spreadsheets --- Spreadsheets have advanced to the point of providing powerful, general-purpose functionality and are among the most widely used decision-support tools in business today. This course deals with decision support using spreadsheets, including: what if analysis; financial, statistical and time/date functions; graphical presentation of data; organizing, sorting, querying and extracting information from spreadsheet and external databases and the World Wide Web; cross-tabulation of data; data tables; creation and management of scenarios; use of a solver to find optimal solutions to problems; the design to macros to support spreadsheet applications; and data maps. An expert level of spreadsheet use is achieved. Lecture-demonstrations illustrate relevant features of spreadsheet software. Students do assigned cases on a computer to reinforce and extend conceptual and operational aspects of the material. Windows-based spreadsheet software (such as Excel) is used.
 
 
TO 513 Spreadsheet Modeling and Applications
  1.5 hours Elective Terms Offered: F14(B), W13(B), W14(B), F13(B)
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in CIS 511, TO 511 or TO 564 
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 311, TO 512, or permission of instructor 
   
  Spreadsheet Modeling and Applications --- This course, a continuation of TO 512, emphasizes problem solving using spreadsheet software. Extensive use is made of a spreadsheet solver (such as Solver in Excel) to formulate and solve practical optimization problems from such mathematical programming areas as linear, integer, and nonlinear programming, and multiple-objective decision making. Probabilistic modeling to support risk analysis in the context of spreadsheets is also studied, using native spreadsheet capabilities alone and then supplementing these capabilities with spreadsheet problem analysis, model formulation, implementation, execution and interpretation. Students do assigned computer work to reinforce and extend conceptual and operational aspects of the material.
 
 
TO 515 Business Application Development with Visual Basic for Excel
  2.25 hours Elective Terms Offered: F14(B), W13(B), W14(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 512 
   
  Business Application Development with Visual Basic for Excel --- This course demonstrates how to use VBA in Excel to automate repetitive and time consuming tasks, generate interactive reports, manipulate charts, filter databases, and run solver. Examples of specific decision support applications, such as product mix and portfolio optimization are presented. Students will develop advanced technical skills with Visual Basic for Excel, and learn how to utilize VBA to create efficient and user friendly business applications. Specifically, students will learn how to enhance applications created in Excel with customized dialog boxes, user defined functions, event-handling procedures, customized toolbars, and more. The course also introduces general programming concepts such as the use of Variables, If statements, Loops, and assignment statements.
 
 
TO 518 Linear Programming I
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
  Advisory Prerequisites: MATH 217, 417, or 419 
  Cross-listed with: MATH 561, IOE 510 
   
  Linear Programming I --- Formulation of problems from the private and public sectors using the mathematical model of linear programming. Development of the simplex algorithm; duality theory and economic interpretations. Postoptimality (sensitivity) analysis application and interpretations. Introduction to transportation and assignment problems; special purpose algorithms and advanced computational techniques. Students have opportunities to formulate and solve models developed from more complex case studies and to use various computer programs.
 
 
TO 548 Integrated Product Development
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, F14
  Advisory Prerequisites: Instructor consent 
   
  Integrated Product Development --- This is a Tauber Institute sponsored elective
open to all graduate students. The course is structured so that students form into teams of four, each with mixed disciplinary backgrounds spanning business, engineering and art/architecture. A product category is announced, and each team acts as an independent firm competing in that product market. This is, each team must independently work through an integrated exercise of market research, product design, product development and manufacture, pricing, forecasting, inventory policy and competition with their product against other firms in both a web-based competition and a physical trade show.
 
 
TO 551 Introduction to Operations
  3 hours Core Terms Offered: S13, F13, F14, M14
  Course Prerequisites: TO 501 and no credit in TO 552 
   
  Introduction to Operations --- This course prepares students to think managerially and analytically about operations processes, and to use the results of analysis to make things work better, faster and cheaper. Operations management studies the value-creating processes by which inputs of materials, labor, capital and information are transformed into products and services which customers want and are willing to pay for. These processes can be managed well or poorly. Knowledge introduced in this course will help you understand the reasons for both.
 
 
TO 552 Operations Management
  2.25 hours Core Terms Offered: W13(A), W14(A)
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in TO 551 
   
  Operations Management --- All value in society is generated by transforming one set of things into other, different things. Without such transformations, there would be no wealth creation and no rationale for business. Operations management is the design and management of those transformation processes. In this course, we will provide a framework for systematically examining and understanding operation management issues. We will also expose you to a few of the most important tools and practices that are useful in managing manufacturing and service production systems.
 
 
TO 557 Applied Business Statistics and Analytics
  2.25 hours Core Terms Offered: F14(A)
   
  Applied Business Statistics and Analytics --- Many business problems are too complex to rely on intuition alone to guide tactical and strategic decisions. This course covers probability, statistics, simulation, regression, and other predictive prescriptive analytic tools that enable managers to analyze business data and generate critical insights for managerial decisions.
 
 
TO 563 Innovation in Global Health Delivery
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: W13(B), W14(A)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 551 or 552 or 605 or equivalent 
   
  Innovation in Global Health Delivery: Strategies for Enhancing Growth and Improving Access in Emerging Markets --- New business models built around operational efficiency offer tremendous potential to improve people's health worldwide. This course will examine how innovations in business models, operations, financing and supply chains are allowing far more people to access better quality healthcare. The course draws extensively on real-world case studies and latest research in this field. Class sessions will feature thought leaders from the field of global health delivery and involve lively debates on important topics. Concepts and approaches from strategy, operations, finance, and supply chain management will be used to understand what determines success and failure of businesses that seek to provide healthcare to low income populations. While there will be a strong emphasis on global health, some of the concepts will be applicable more generally to product and service delivery in emerging markets.
This course is divided into two modules: The first part of the course will focus on design of systems that ensure access to medicines, vaccines and other health technologies. The second part of the course will focus on design of systems for health service delivery.
Specific learning objectives for this course are:
- Develop an in-depth understanding of the key issues in designing and managing healthcare delivery (products and services) in emerging markets.
- Understand the important role of operations and supply chain management in improving effectiveness and efficiency of healthcare delivery in emerging markets.
- Ability to formulate strategies for market entry in the healthcare/life sciences sector in emerging markets.
- Understand the role of product and process innovation in global health delivery (through practical examples and cases).
- Understand factors that influence the adoption of new health technologies in emerging markets and operational strategies to speed up adoption.
- Understand the roles played by different agencies in the provision of healthcare in emerging markets and understand the critical value of inter-agency coordination in this context.
- Discover and understand high impact opportunities for social entrepreneurship and operational innovation to improve global health delivery.
 
 
TO 566 Applied Regression and Data Analysis
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: W13(A)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 502 or equivalent 
   
  Applied Regression and Data Analysis --- The course considers procedures for data collection, effective analysis, and interpretation for management control, planning, and forecasting. The course stresses the capabilities and limitation of statistical methods together with the considerations necessary for their effective application and correct interpretation. The course focuses primarily on multiple regression models, which includes weighted least squares, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance. Readings, cases, examples and exercises are drawn from diverse areas of business, including finance, marketing research, accounting, economics and general management.
 
 
TO 567 Data Mining and Applied Multivariate Analysis
  1.5 hours Elective Terms Offered: W13(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 501 or 502 or equivalent 
   
  Data Mining and Applied Multivariate Analysis --- Innovations in information technology has resulted in data intensive, managerial environments. A virtual flood of information flows through systems, such as enterprise resource planning and the Internet. What to do with all this data? How can it be transformed into actionable information? The objective of this course is to introduce business leaders to powerful methods for understanding and obtaining managerial insights from multivariate data. The course is designed for both managers who have direct responsibility for producing analyses and for managers who have to interact with area experts who produce the analyses. The methods include data reduction techniques - principle component analysis, factor analysis, and multidimensional scaling; classification methods - discriminate analysis and cluster analysis; and relational methods - multivariate regression, logistic regression, and neural networks. Emphasis is placed on the application of the method, the type of data that it uses, the assumptions behind it, and interpreting the output. User friendly and powerful statistical software will be used.
 
 
TO 572 Applied Business Forecasting I
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: F14(B), F13(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 502 
   
  Applied Business Forecasting I --- Students acquire hands-on experience with building and applying forecasting models to actual data on sales, inventories, income, earnings per share, and other variables widely encountered in business. Understanding practical issues of data acquisition, data analysis, and presentation to management in both oral and written form are emphasized. Problems of trend and seasonal forecasting in marketing, production and finance (other fields are considered, as is short-term forecasting with exponential smoothing.) The course features problem sets, cases, and a capstone case at the end of the term, done by teams.
 
 
TO 582 Action Learning Projects in Operations, Procurement, and Supply Chain Management
  7.5 hours Terms Offered: F13, F14
  Course Prerequisites: TO 551 or 552 or 591 or 605 
   
  Action Learning Projects in Operations, Procurement, and Supply Chain Management --- This course provides an opportunity for students to deepen their knowledge in operations, procurement and supply chain management through action learning projects. Students will address a major operations or supply chain problem in a company through a 14-week action learning project. The course is taught in cooperation with AT Kearney, and students will also be provided guest lectures (by AT Kearney and Fortune 500 company executives) on how to approach consulting in operations and supply chain and on recent developments in these areas from different industries.
 
 
TO 586 Entrepreneurial Operations
  1.5 hours Core Terms Offered: W13(A), W14(A)
   
  Entrepreneurial Operations --- This course will introduce aspiring technology-based
entrepreneurs to product and process design and costing. Technology-based innovation is packaged in or affects a physical product that adds value to people's lives. These products must be manufactured, and the design of the manufacturing process determines in large measure the COGS entry on your financial statements. Topics covered will include product design, material selection, process design, process costing, safety, quality and environmental issues, and managing a startup. Understanding how this is done, and the cost and performance of alternative materials and processes, provides the information you need to be effective in outsourcing.
 (more)
 
 
TO 593 Operations Management
  2.25 hours Core Terms Offered: P14, P13
  Advisory Prerequisites: Global MBA Student 
   
  Operations Management --- This course introduces the basic concepts and issues in managing production systems. Readings, problems and cases are used. Major topics covered are quality assurance, line balancing, project management, production planning and scheduling and inventory control.
 
 
TO 595 Applied Business Statistics
  2.25 hours Core Terms Offered: W13(B), W14(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: Global MBA student only 
   
  Applied Business Statistics --- This course covers probability, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, and simple and multiple regression analysis. Business applications are used to illustrate these concepts. The course requires familiarity with the statistical analysis package of MS Excel.
 
 
TO 601 Information Systems
  3 hours Core Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
  Course Prerequisites: No credit in STRATEGY/TO 514 
   
  Information Systems --- An introduction to information systems for managers. Topics discussed include the kinds of information systems that support individual, group and corporate goals, with an emphasis not only on the hardware/software but also the managerial concerns with the design and implementation of information technology.
 
 
TO 605 Manufacturing and Supply Operations
  3 hours Terms Offered: W13, W14, W13(A), W14(A)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 551 and 552 
  Cross-listed with: MFG 605 
   
  Manufacturing and Supply Operations --- This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of operations and inventory management. The foundation of the course is a system of manufacturing laws collectively knows as "Factory Physics". These laws relate various measures of plan performance such as throughput, cycle time, work-in-process, customer service variability, and quality, in a consistent manner and provide framework for evaluating and improving operations. Concepts and methods are examined via exercises and case studies.
 
 
TO 616 Project Management
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: W13(B), W14(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 551/552 
   
  Project Management --- This course focuses on strategies and tools useful in management of non-repetitive business activities. Examples of such activities include construction, new product development and market introduction, consulting engagements, and organization restructurings. Tools to be introduced include work breakdown structure, network representation, PERT/CPM models and analysis, Gantt charts, time and cost models, PM software, and probabilistic analysis. Strategy considerations covered will include dealing with uncertainty, resource constraints, dealing with shared and requested vs. dedicated and commanded resources, and milestone management.
 
 
TO 618 Supply Chain Analytics
  3 hours Terms Offered: W13, W14
   
  Applied Business Analytics and Decisions --- This course introduces students to decision support models (using optimization and simulation techniques) that are most frequently used in logistics and supply chain applications. The specific topics will include:
1) The role of decision support tools in dealing with a spectrum of supply chain problems.
2) Effective communication of suggested solutions, and
3) Specific models and techniques, including:
a) DC location and network design
b) Optimizing inventory levels in distribution network
c) Forecasting
d) Aggregate planning and resource allocation decisions
e) Product Changes / Economies of Scale
f) Integrating supply chain and demand management (benefits and costs of delayed differentiation, mass customizations)
g) Computation of transfer prices
h) Revenue Management
i) Estimation of product and customer costs to determine total landed cost
 
 
TO 620 Global Supply Chain Management
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 551/552 
  Cross-listed with: MKT 640 
   
  Global Supply Chain Management --- This course aims to develop an understanding of key devices of supply chain performance and their interrelationship with firm strategy. Special emphasis is given to tools and skills necessary to develop solutions for a variety of supply chain design problems and inter-firm and intra-firm coordination issues.
 
 
TO 621 Logistics
  2.25 hours Terms Offered: W13(B), W14(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: TO 301 or 501 or 502 or 595 or 618; can be taken concurrently 
   
  Logistics --- This course refers to the planning, implementation and control of the efficient forward and reverse flow and storage of goods, services, and information between the point of origin and point of consumption. This course trains students in the various aspects of logistics management. Primary topics include the management of inventory, facilities, warehousing and transportation, with in-depth study of these individual elements as well as examination of integrated logistics strategy and network design. Other topics with ancillary coverage include sustainability in logistics, international logistics and globalization, competition and co-ordination, role of information flow and IT, etc.

Instruction will be by a combination of lectures, case studies and numerical assignments. Students will also run computer simulations of a logistics system, as well as learn to use a commercial logistics planning software. Guest lectures and a facility tour may also be included. The aim is to train students to perform and manage logistical functions within an organization, as well as assess and design the overall logistics strategy of the organization.
 
 
TO 623 Information Technology Strategy in Supply Chain and Logistics
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: F14(B), F13(B)
   
  Information Technology Strategy in Supply Chain and Logistics --- Digital technologies have permeated every aspect of modern business. The capacity to execute any business model rests heavily on the approach taken by firms in organizing their information architecture. This course will explore the role of information architecture on Supply Chain and Logistics functions. We will discuss the dominant technologies traditionally used in planning, forecasting, scheduling and managing supply chains. We will then explore the emerging new technologies such as SOA ( Service Oriented Architecture) that enable firms to innovate in their business models through dynamic engagement with their supply partners in evolving global supply networks. Class discussions and case studies will include technology and business process choices in new product development, design, MRP, ERP, distribution and logistics.
 
 
TO 624 Strategic Sourcing
  2.25 hours Terms Offered: F13(A), F14(A)
   
  Strategic Sourcing --- Strategic sourcing in the collaborative and structured process of critically analyzing an organization's spending and using this information to make business decisions about acquiring commodities and services more effectively and efficiently.

The steps in a strategic sourcing process are:
1. Assessment of a company's current spend (what is bought where?)
2. Assessment of the supply market (who offers what?)
3. Development of a sourcing strategy (where to buy what while minimizing risk and cost)
4. Identification of suitable suppliers
5. Negotiation with suppliers (products, prices)
6. Implementation of new supply structure
7. Track results and restart assessment (continuous cycle)

This course will provide you a framework for thinking about strategic sourcing and tools to effectively implement the strategic sourcing process.
 
 
TO 630 New Age of Innovation
  2.25 hours Terms Offered: F13(A), F14(A)
  Cross-listed with: STRATEGY 630 
   
  New Age of Innovation --- This course introduces students to the emerging nature of competition and the critical capabilities that firms need to build to thrive in this environment. Based on the contents in a book co-authored by professors C.K. Prahalad and M.S. Krishnan, the course presents a different perspective on business innovation focusing on co-creating customer experience and global resource leverage with the social and technical architecture in the firm as the two key enablers. The specific implications for various business functions in this new approach to compete will be discussed. Students interested in functional roles or consulting will find this course useful.
 
 
TO 678 Service Innovation Management
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: F13(B)
   
  Service Innovation Management: Developing Valuable e-Services that Boost the Bottom Line --- Service Innovation Management focuses on the process of designing innovative new information-based services, including problem definition, research, design, development, and execution. Concepts include blueprinting, ideation, blue ocean strategy, branding, observation and interview, personas, storyboards, customer journey, stage-gate process and project portfolio management. Skills developed and tools gained in the class will be enduring and valuable for consultants, financial managers, marketers, and anyone else charged with leading a group in developing valuable new information-based services.
 
 
TO 701 Topics in Global Operations
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, F14
  Advisory Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in the Tauber Institute program 
   
  Topics in Global Operations --- The course begins with an overview of operations in the context of corporate strategy. This is followed by a series of modules dealing with various topics of importance in operations, such as lean production systems, supply chain management, design for manufacturability, facilities planning, the environmental, legal, and ethical issues in operations, and product design. Students learn how all these aspects of operations interconnect and how they may apply to Tauber team projects.
 
 
TO 703 Tauber Institute Team Project
  1.5 - 3 hours Terms Offered: F13(A), F14(A), W13(B), W14(B)
  Advisory Prerequisites: Must be enrolled in Tauber Institute program 
   
  Tauber Institute Team Project --- This course is a paid, multi-disciplinary team project under faculty direction at an industry site. The projects are highly challenging operations-related assignments with both business and engineering aspects. Students may choose from a wide selection of projects, ranging from high-level strategic analysis and positioning, to detailed work flow issues for a specific product line. After a successful summer on site, Tauber students present project results at an all-day conference known as Spotlight.
 
 
TO 735 Special Topics in Supply Chain Management
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: F13, F14
   
  Special Topics in Supply Chain Management --- This course will address current topics of interest to supply chain professionals. As such the content of the course may vary in subsequent years depending on current events and emerging issues. Several of the topics will involve external guest speakers. Sample topics include:

1. Sustainability and Supply Chains (e.g., Reverse Logistics, Closed-Loop Supply Chains, Carbon foot-print)
2. Supply Chain Risk and Security
3. Corporate Social Responsibility and Ethical Issues in Supply Chain Design
4. Globalization of Supply Networks (e.g., China Factor)
5. Supply Chain Relationships and Policy Implications (e.g., retail industry practices in Category Managements, use of slotting fees, etc. Some of these practices have anti-trust implications and FTC always keeps a close watch).
6. Infrastructure issues in Supply Chain - country specific issues on role of infrastructure (roads, railways, and ports) and supply chain competitiveness
7. Special challenges in managing Supply Chains across various verticals (e.g., SCM issues differ across automotive, hi-tech, pharmaceutical, retail and students need to be sensitive to these differences.
 
 
TO 750 Independent Study
  1 - 3 hours Elective Terms Offered: M13, S14, F13, W13, F14, W14, M14
   
  Independent Study Project --- Independent study projects, supervised by faculty, are available to graduate business students in good academic standing. To select a project, students should consult the appropriate professor about the nature of the project and the number of credit hours the work would earn. Students earn one to three credit hours per project and may elect only one study project in a term. Graduate business students should consult their program bulletins for information regarding total number of projects and credits that can be applied to their degree. To register for a project students must submit an approved Independent Study Project application, available online.
 
 
TO 885 Research Topics in Technology and Operations
  1.5 hours Terms Offered: W13(B), W13(A)
  Advisory Prerequisites: Ph.D. students only; permission of instructor required 
   
  Research Topics in Technology and Operations --- Research topic courses are used to cover current topics. Courses are not offered every term, and coverage differs from one offering to the next. When a course is offered, the instructor will provide a course description.
 
 
TO 899 Doctoral Seminar- TO
  3 hours Terms Offered: F13, F14, W14
   
  Doctoral Seminar in Technology and Operations --- Reading and research in various topics in technology and operations, including applications to business problems and research methodologies. Instruction is through assigned readings and group discussions. Designed primarily for Ph.D. applicants.
 
 
TO 990 Dissertation-PreCandidacy
  1 - 8 hours Terms Offered: F13, W13, F14, W14
  Advisory Prerequisites: Ph.D. students only; permission of instructor required 
   
  Dissertation-PreCandidacy --- Dissertation research at the precandidacy stage.
 
 
TO 995 Dissertation-Candidacy
  4 - 8 hours Terms Offered: P14, F13, P13, W13, F14, W14
  Course Prerequisites: Candidate 
  Advisory Prerequisites: Ph.D. students only; permission of instructor required. 
   
  Dissertation-Candidacy --- Dissertation research at the candidacy stage.